Hall of Governors

In this gallery, we commemorate New York’s past in the very building where today’s leaders work to build New York’s future.

Over the past two and a half centuries, 56 individuals have served as governor of New York State. Most are memorialized here with official portraits painted by leading artists of their day from life sittings during or after their service here in the Capitol. Like the leaders they depict, the portraits are an important part of our state’s history.

Many of the governors portrayed here also served as United States Congressmen, Cabinet members, Supreme Court justices and vice presidents, and four of them were elected president of the United States. However, they are recalled here for the leadership they provided to the Empire State.

For more than 100 years, the Governors of New York State have worked in this hallway. Newly redisplayed, these paintings will inspire visitors as well as our future leaders, who will someday be part of New York’s magnificent history.

Bill of Sale of Slaves, 1762

This document records the sale and transfer of legal custody of slaves – a mother and her two children – held by Peter Bronck of Coxsackie, New York, to Mathew van den Berck. It is specifically noted that the sale is conducted according to the “customs of the plantation of British America,” a recognition that slavery had been outlawed in England by 1762, but was still legal in the colonies.

New York State Library Collection

The General Association Declaration, May 1775

Almost a year and a half before the Continental Congress would dissolve the political bonds between the colonies and Great Britain and assert that people possessed certain inalienable rights, the New York State General Association declared its own independence from King George III. When news of how the Massachusetts militia successfully fought the British at Lexington and Concord, the delegates of the General Association drafted a statement declaring that New York was no longer a colony. This important sign of New York’s solidarity with Massachusetts helped strengthen the political bond between the colonies, which paved the way for the 1776 Declaration of Independence. New York’s leadership proved to be pivotal in securing a unified colonial statement of independence.

On loan from the Onondaga Historical Association, Syracuse, NY

The General Association Declaration, May 1775

Almost a year and a half before the Continental Congress would dissolve the political bonds between the colonies and Great Britain and assert that people possessed certain inalienable rights, the New York State General Association declared its own independence from King George III. When news of how the Massachusetts militia successfully fought the British at Lexington and Concord, the delegates of the General Association drafted a statement declaring that New York was no longer a colony. This important sign of New York’s solidarity with Massachusetts helped strengthen the political bond between the colonies, which paved the way for the 1776 Declaration of Independence. New York’s leadership proved to be pivotal in securing a unified colonial statement of independence.

On loan from the Onondaga Historical Association, Syracuse, NY

First Constitution of the State of New York, 1777

John Jay and other Revolutionary patriots drafted the Constitution, which was ratified by a convention at Kingston April 20, 1777. The constitution established the three branches of government and protected basic liberties. This is the final approved draft.

New York State Archives Collection

John Jay (1745 – 1829)

John Jay, a Founding Father of the United States, served the new nation in both law and diplomacy. He established important judicial precedents as the first chief justice of the United States (1789–95) and negotiated the Jay Treaty of 1794, which settled major grievances with Great Britain and promoted commercial prosperity.

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Jay graduated from King's College (now Columbia University) in 1764 and was admitted to the bar in 1768, establishing himself as a successful attorney in New York. He helped secure the approval of the Declaration of Independence (1776) in New York, where he was a member of the provincial Congress. The following year he helped draft New York's first constitution, was elected the state's first chief justice, and in 1778 was chosen president of the Continental Congress.

During and after the American Revolution, Jay was a minister (ambassador) to Spain and France, helping to fashion United States foreign policy, and to secure favorable peace terms from Great Britain (with Jay's Treaty of 1794) and the First French Republic.

Jay, a proponent of strong, centralized government, co-wrote the Federalist Papers, along with Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. As a leader of the new Federalist Party, Jay was the Governor of New York State from 1795 to 1801, and became the state's leading opponent of slavery. His first two attempts to emancipate the slaves in New York failed in 1777 and in 1785, but his third attempt succeeded in 1799. The 1799 act, a gradual emancipation act, that he signed into law, eventually brought about the emancipation of all New York slaves before his death in 1829.


Poughkeepsie Journal 1788

A convention of delegates from each county in New York met at Poughkeepsie and after long debate ratified the proposed U.S. Constitution on July 26, 1788. The Poughkeepsie Convention proposed amendments that protected fundamental liberties and formed the basis for the later U.S. Bill of Rights (1791). Pages shown contain signatures of convention delegates, including Alexander Hamilton and John Jay.

New York State Archives Collection


Letter from Morgan Lewis to John Woodward Esquire

The letter is undated but was probably written during Lewis’s term as Attorney General, 1791 – 1792. The engraving of Governor Lewis is taken from a daguerreotype. Although Lewis was born in 1754 and served in the American Revolution, he lived long enough to be photographed.

From the Collection of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo


Appointment Letter Signed by Governor George Clinton, 1803

Appointment of John F. Losee as Paymaster, Dutchess County Militia. Signed by Governor George Clinton, March 23, 1803.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Letter from Governor Daniel D. Tompkins to Robert Brent, Esquire, March 11, 1809

The letter concerns remittance of funds for the “Oswego Detachment”.

From the Collection of Howard Glaser


Appointment Letter Signed by Governor Daniel D. Tompkins, 1811

Appointment of Allen Brown as Coroner, Albany County. Signed by Governor Daniel D. Tompkins, June 28, 1811.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Martin Van Buren Autograph Letter Signed, page 1

Martin Van Buren was New York’s Attorney General from 1815-1819. This document contains an opinion written by him on June 1, 1818 in response to State Comptroller MacIntyre’s request that he comment on legislation relating to fees to be paid to the State Comptroller.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Martin Van Buren Autograph Letter Signed, page 2

Martin Van Buren was New York’s Attorney General from 1815-1819. This document contains an opinion written by him on June 1, 1818 in response to State Comptroller MacIntyre’s request that he comment on legislation relating to fees to be paid to the State Comptroller.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Legal Document Signed by Attorney General Martin Van Buren, 1818

Legal Document signed by Attorney General Martin Van Buren in 1818. Ten years later Van Buren would be elected Governor of New York. He served less than three months, resigning when he was appointed Secretary of State by President Jackson. The envelope with this document is addressed to Enos T. Throop, who succeeded Van Buren as Governor.

From the Collection of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo


Appointment Letter Signed by Governor DeWitt Clinton, 1819

Appointment of twelve Justices of the Peace for Saratoga County. Signed by Governor DeWitt Clinton, March 16, 1819.

From the Collection of Howard Glaser


Cask Used by Governor De Witt Clinton in Erie Canal Opening Ceremony, 1825

After eight years of construction, the Erie Canal was officially opened on October 26, 1825. Governor De Witt Clinton, aboard the Seneca Chief, ceremoniously entered the canal at Buffalo and led a flotilla of boats eastward. It took an hour and a half for a series of relay cannons set up from Buffalo to New York City to notify people of the flotilla’s departure. Nine days later, on November 4th, the flotilla entered New York City. The boats assembled off of Sandy Hook, where Clinton poured water from Lake Erie into the Atlantic Ocean using this keg, symbolizing a “wedding of the waters.” The Erie Canal forged a vital link between the coastal and western regions of the United States and helped make New York City and the communities located along the canal some of the most important and prosperous cities in the nation.

On loan from the New-York Historical Society


Cashiers Receipt from the New York State Bank, October 2, 1835

From Canal Commissioner, (and future Governor), William C. Bouck to Thomas W. Olcott. It is signed by four Commissioners of the Canal fund including another future Governor, John Adams Dix.

From the Collection of Howard Glaser


Education Law, Signed by Governor William H. Seward, 1842

Law supported by William H. Seward allowing New York City schools to operate in the same manner as state schools.

New York State Archives Collection


Edwin D. Morgan Signed Document, 1860

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Military Appointment Signed by Governor Horatio Seymour, November 3, 1864

Governor Horatio Seymour appointed John Fitzpatrick as First Lieutenant in the 150th Regiment NY State Volunteers.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Military Certificate Signed by Governor Reuben E. Fenton, 1866

Military certificate “For Gallant and Meritorious Services” signed by Governor Reuben E. Fenton on September 21, 1866.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


The New York City “Ring” 1873

Samuel J. Tilden earned a reputation as a reformer in large part by fighting the financial and political corruption of both the Canal Ring and the Tweed Ring in New York City. However, not all New Yorkers approved of these actions. In this piece, Tilden fought back against the New York Times’ characterizations of his actions as partisan, arguing that the rings needed to be abolished for government to effectively meet the needs of the people. Shown is the title page from a book he published in 1873 on his fight.

New York State Library Collection

Harper’s Weekly May 15, 1875

The cover of Harper’s Weekly for May 15, 1875, featured Governor Samuel Tilden handing out pardons at “Tammany Ring Head-Quarters.” In the background, police are chasing men from the “Canal Ring.” The caption reads: “The Next Pardon in the Reform Farce(?): Governor Tilden: “That you may be able to give State Evidence against – let’s see – oh! – the Canal Ring.”

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Harper’s Weekly was published in New York City from 1857 until 1916; it featured foreign and domestic news and included essays, humor and fiction. One of its most famous cartoonists was Thomas Nast, the artist who drew this cartoon.

New York State Library Collection

The Brooklyn Bridge Waltz: Musical Burlesque in the Style of the Flowery Kingdom

Cover illustration: View of Brooklyn Bridge by moonlight. Characters from burlesque as follows: seated couple in clouds at right (representing Miss Brooklyn and Young York); older man wearing 18th century costume seated in clouds at left (representing Old Knick).

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"A. Nam Foh" is an anagram for A. Hoffmann, designated as copyright holder, along with C. Bunce. This was probably Adolph Hoffmann, listed in contemporary Brooklyn city directories as a music teacher. Bunce, was probably Charles Bunce, who appears in the directories as a music dealer.

Foh, A. Nam. Brooklyn Bridge Waltz: Musical Burlesque in the Style of the Flowery Kingdom (Brooklyn, N.Y.: C. Bunce, 1875)

New York State Library Collection


Democratic Campaign Book 1876

The title of this book is Lives and Public Services of Samuel J. Tilden and Thomas A. Hendricks: 1776, A Revolution for Independence. 1876, A Revolution for Reform. In addition to this image of Gov. Tilden speaking at the Manhattan Club in New York City, Tuesday evening, December 29, 1876, the book includes portraits of Tilden and Thomas A. Hendricks and an image of the executive mansion in Albany. On the book’s cover, embossed in gold: Democratic Campaign Book, 1876

New York State Library Collection

Alice Roosevelt’s comments on the Executive Mansion, 1877

Alice Roosevelt was 14 when her father became governor of New York State on January 1, 1899. When she penned her autobiography in 1933, she reminisced about moving into the Executive Mansion in Albany:

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“… The Executive Mansion was a big, ugly, rather shabby house, larger than any house we had heretofore lived in, hideously furnished. I think the prize room for ugliness when we were there was the billiard room on the top floor, in which hung what I should say were crayon portraits of all the previous governors. It really was a very dismal house. The family were not sufficiently well-to-do to bring any of their own things to cheer it up; I doubt if they would have anyway. Next to the billiard room in dreariness was the breakfast room, a medium-sized room, its one window looking out on an area facing north, and there I pursued my education with my very nice governess, Miss Gertrude Young …”

Longworth, Alice Roosevelt. Crowded Hours: Reminiscences of Alice Roosevelt Longworth (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1933), New York State Library


Deed of sale for Executive Mansion, 1877

The State Legislature appropriated $50,000 in 1877 to purchase a furnished executive mansion for governors to live in. Governor Samuel J. Tilden, the Speaker of the Assembly, and the President Pro Tempore of the Senate decided to acquire the property that Tilden had been renting on Eagle Street in Albany, and came in under budget to do so.

Courtesy of Albany County Hall of Records, Thomas G. Clingan, Albany County Clerk.


Tests, tests and more tests, 1877

In his report on the progress of the building of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1877, Chief Engineer Washington Roebling commented on the efforts made to secure appropriate cable wire:

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“[The cable wire] samples were … tested in conformity with paragraph 16 of the specifications, which says: ‘All parties who expect to bid on this wire are requested to send samples in accordance with these specifications, the samples to weigh no less than 100 lbs., and to contain two rings.’

“The only object of this section was first, to satisfy myself that each bidder could make such wire as was called for in the specifications, and secondly, that each bidder should satisfy himself that such wire could be easily make, and involved no impossible demands.

“The testing of these samples was performed by Col. Paine and Mr. Martin …”

Roebling, Washington Augustus. Report of the Chief Engineer of the New York & Brooklyn Bridge, January 1, 1877 (Brooklyn: Eagle Print, 1877). New York State


Letter from Horatio Seymour, 1879

Letter from Horatio Seymour December 2, 1879, indicating his regrets at not being able to attend the “International Fair” and noting that “. . . we must depend upon agriculture to keep up the prosperity of our country.”

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Letter from Governor-elect Grover Cleveland to J.E. Farnsworth December 17, 1882

On letterhead of his Buffalo law firm – Cleveland, Bissell & Sicard, Weed Block, cor. Main & Swan Sts. – Grover Cleveland, a bachelor, outlined what he believed he needed to set up housekeeping in Albany.

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The Letter says:

My dear Sir,

Your letter of the 15th came duly to hand.

What I want in the man servant is somebody that will be willing to do anything and who is intelligent enough to do the marketing etc. I don’t want him to be much of a butler or steward, and above all things he must be devoted to me. On the whole I have concluded to bring the man I want for that purpose with me, or will send him down in advance. I am very glad to hear that you have so soon found a good housekeeper.

It seems to me that a housekeeper, a cook, a man and one girl of all work besides the gardener will be enough to start the establishment. I have forgotten whether we laid it out with one or two upstairs girls. I don’t want a lot of servants about, with nothing to do. We can add to their number as necessity requires.

Has Mrs. Farnsworth searched the house to see if there is plenty of bed linen, table ware etc. etc.?

In relation to stores I will write you in a few days. I shall perhaps want you to start me off in this direction, though I have quite a notion in my head that I shall get a good many things in New York.

I shall bother you and your good wife a good deal in these matters but I don’t know how I can help it.

If you agree with me that one girl besides the cook and housekeeper will be enough to start with please “finish your tickets” as you have commenced with the exception of the man servant. If you do not agree with me give me your ideas.

I am very glad that the staff promises so well. I do very much hope that you will see it best to retain the present ap’t adjutant general.

I understood Mr. Lamont to say that you intended to see me before you organized your office. Let me know how you get on with the housekeeping arrangements.

Yours truly
Grover Cleveland

New York State Library Collection


Puck Magazine Cover, December 27, 1882

The cover of Puck for December 27, 1882, featured Governor-elect Grover Cleveland hosting a party where ward heelers and wealthy supporters, led by Hubert O. Thompson, were to receive their office appointments and other patronage perks in return for their help in getting him elected.

Puck was a humor magazine, published between 1871 and 1918, that featured cartoons, caricatures and political satire. This cartoon is the work of Frederick Burr Opper, who worked for Puck from ca. 1880 to 1898.

New York State Library Collection

New York’s Civil Service Law, 1883

The law was the first state statute of its kind in the country. Theodore Roosevelt headed the assembly committee that introduced the bill, and Governor Grover Cleveland signed it. Cleveland and Roosevelt built their reputations as public reformers by creating and implementing civil service legislation on both the state and federal levels, reducing the power of the ‘spoils system’.

New York State Archives Collection

The Caissons, 1885

East River Bridge: Laws and Engineer’s Reports, 1867-1884 ([Brooklyn: Eagle Book and Job Printing Dept., 1885?] New York State Library


The Brooklyn Bridge and the Human Brain, 1866-1883

In his history of the Brooklyn Bridge, Samuel W. Green waxed euphorically on the part the human brain played in the building of the edifice:

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“The Human Brain … consider that this mass of masonry and metal is the product of that matter, of which each one of us carries more or less behind his eyes; that it was called into existence, and set its task by mere vibrations in that porous mass easily lost in the inside of a tall hat; that everything here was first a thought, and a thought only. Where has this Bridge been actually built? In the brains of the two Roeblings, father and son …”

Green, Samuel W. A Complete History of the New York and Brooklyn Bridge, from Its Conception in 1866 to Its Completion in 1883. (New York: S.W. Green’s Son, 1883). New York State Library


Grover Cleveland’s Resignation Notice January 6, 1885

On letterhead of the Executive Chamber, Grover Cleveland tendered his resignation as Governor of New York State as he prepared to assume the duties of President of the United States.

New York State Library Collection

Factory Investigation 1886

The first factory inspecting law passed in New York

New York State Archives Collection


Campaign Flyer for Levi P. Morton (1888)

Before he was elected Governor of New York State, Levi P. Morton was elected Vice President of the United States in 1888. This flyer includes a black-and-white line drawing of head-and-shoulders portrait of Morton.

New York State Library Collection

War Veterans Parade March 1889

The War Veterans Parade March illustrates the political power of the Grand Army of the Republic in the decades after the Civil War. Medallion portraits of Benjamin Harrison and Levi P. Morton are almost dwarfed by scenes designed to evoke images of the war: tents, soldiers in formation, stacked rifles, a cannon and an anchor.

New York State Library Collection

Thank You Note from Hamilton Fish, 1891

Thank you note from Hamilton Fish, April 2, 1891. Written after he retired from public life and two years before his death,

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques

Certificate of Appointment of George Moore Smith Signed by Governor Levi P. Morton August 31, 1895

The certificate appointed George Moore Smith colonel of the 69th Regiment, Infantry, National Guard, New York. In August 1897, Smith was named New York City police commissioner.

New York State Library Collection

Thank You Note from Governor Levi Parsons Morton, 1896

Thank you note from Governor Levi Parsons Morton, April 28, 1896.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques

Greater New York City Charter 1897

The charter “unite[d] into one municipality under the corporate name of The City of New York, the various communities lying in and about New York Harbor, including the City and County of New York, the City of Brooklyn and the County of Kings, the County of Richmond, and part of the County of Queens, and ... provide[d] for the government thereof.”

New York State Library Collection

David B. Hill Signed Typed Letter, May 1, 1901

Brief letter to Julius Lehmann asking for an appointment to confer; ten years after leaving office of governor.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Benjamin Odell Signed Typed Letter
1903

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Postcards of the Governor’s Mansion 1906, 1909, 1948

These postcards offer views of the Governor’s Mansion in 1906 (green-toned card), 1909 (sepia-toned card) and 1948 (full color), showing how the building and the grounds changed and remained the same. It cost a penny to mail the 1948 card.

New York State Library Collection

Appointment Letter Signed by Governor Horace White, 1910

Appointment of Lt. Col. Anthine Watson LaRose. Signed by Governor Horace White, October 14, 1910.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Letter from Governor Martin Glynn, 1913

Letter from Governor Martin Glynn, November 28, 1913, to Gilbert H. Kreoll expressing Glynn’s interest in deepening the Hudson River to improve navigation and transportation. He appoints Kreoll as a delegate to the National Rivers and Harbors Congress “to advocate the interests of New York State Waterways.”

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Appointment Letter Signed by Governor William Sulzer, 1913

Revocation of appointment of John Woodward as Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Supreme Court. Signed by Governor William Sulzer, March 1, 1913.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Factory Investigating Commission 1913-1914

Laws passed due to the urging of the Factory Investigating Commission prohibited employment of children under age fourteen in dangerous professions, mandated sprinklers and other fire prevention systems, and more generally aimed to increase workplace safety.

New York State Archives Collection


Appointment Letter, 1914

Appointment of George C. Hawley as a member of the New York Commercial Tercentenary Commission. Signed by Governor Martin Glynn, October 8, 1914.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Letter from Governor Charles Whitman, 1915

Letter from Governor Charles Whitman, May 11, 1915, to Eugene Richards, Superintendent of Banks, requesting that state agency heads facilitate a study to be carried out by the Senate Committee on Civil Service.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, 1916

Proclamation declaring Thursday, November 30, 1916, Thanksgiving Day. Signed by Governor Charles Whitman, November 10, 1916.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Memorial to Theodore Roosevelt

Published by the New York State Legislature, February 21, 1919.

From the Collection of Howard Glaser


Certification for Warrant Signed by Governor Nathan Miller , 1922

Certification of issuance of a warrant for the return of a fugitive from West Virginia. Signed by Governor Nathan Miller, June 13, 1922.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Nathan Miller Signed Photograph

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Warrant to Arrest Signed by Governor Alfred E Smith, 1923

Warrant to arrest and deliver a fugitive back to New Jersey. Signed by Governor Alfred E. Smith, January 8, 1923.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Thank you note from Governor Alfred E. Smith, 1924

Thank you note from Governor Alfred E. Smith, March 3, 1924, to John Clarke, Director of the State Museum.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Statutory Realignment of State Government, 1924

Smith was a reform governor whose agenda required exceptional political skills to enact. Establishing a commission on “Reconstruction, Retrenchment, and Reorganization” in 1919, he spent years finding the most efficient ways to reorganize state government, often against the will of established political interests. This chart shows with great detail the workings of government agencies and Smith’s recommendations to the Legislature about how they could be consolidated, abolished, or redirected to run more effectively.

New York State Archives Collection


Thank You Letter from Herbert Lehman, November 16, 1928

This thank you letter includes political reminiscences and was written just before Lehman became Lieutenant Governor of New York. A newspaper photograph of Lehman as Governor is attached to this letter.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Proclamation by the Governor, 1932

Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt’s proclamation establishing the Temporary Emergency Relief Administration (TERA). TERA was a state program that provided for the relief of citizens affected by the Great Depression and a precursor to many federal New Deal programs that Roosevelt later instituted.

New York State Archives Collection


Letter from Governor Herbert Lehman, 1936

Letter from Governor Herbert Lehman, October 13, 1936, to his agency heads encouraging them to support the Community Chest campaign.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


The True Story of Fala, 1942

Fala, a Scottish terrier, was born on April 7, 1940, and given to President Roosevelt by Mrs. Augustus G. Kellog of Westport, Connecticut, through Franklin Roosevelt’s cousin, Margaret “Daisy” Suckley. At first his name was Big Boy. Franklin renamed him ‘Murray the Outlaw of Falahill,’ after a Scottish ancestor. His nickname became Fala.

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Ms. Suckley wrote The True Story of Fala and Alice Dalgliesh drew the images of Fala that are interspersed with photographs of the dog throughout the book.
After President Roosevelt died, Fala went to live with Mrs. Roosevelt at Val-Kill. Eventually Mrs. Roosevelt brought Fala's grandson, Tamas McFala, to live at Val-Kill, and be Fala's playmate. On April 5, 1952, Fala passed away and was buried in the Rose Garden next to the sun dial not far from the graves of President and Mrs. Roosevelt on what would have been his twelfth birthday, April 7, 1952.
New York State Library Collection


The True Story of Fala, 1942

Fala, a Scottish terrier, was born on April 7, 1940, and given to President Roosevelt by Mrs. Augustus G. Kellog of Westport, Connecticut, through Franklin Roosevelt’s cousin, Margaret “Daisy” Suckley. At first his name was Big Boy. Franklin renamed him ‘Murray the Outlaw of Falahill,’ after a Scottish ancestor. His nickname became Fala.

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Ms. Suckley wrote The True Story of Fala and Alice Dalgliesh drew the images of Fala that are interspersed with photographs of the dog throughout the book.
After President Roosevelt died, Fala went to live with Mrs. Roosevelt at Val-Kill. Eventually Mrs. Roosevelt brought Fala's grandson, Tamas McFala, to live at Val-Kill, and be Fala's playmate. On April 5, 1952, Fala passed away and was buried in the Rose Garden next to the sun dial not far from the graves of President and Mrs. Roosevelt on what would have been his twelfth birthday, April 7, 1952.
New York State Library Collection


Herbert Lehman Signed Photograph

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Thomas Dewey Signed Photograph

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Thank You Letter from Governor Nelson Rockefeller, 1962

Thank you letter from Governor Nelson Rockefeller, May 18, 1962, to a Mrs. Hurd of Albany for her assistance with a reception at the Executive Mansion.

Loaned By Dennis Holzman Antiques


Message to the Legislature on the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. 1968

New York’s reaction to the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. was tumultuous, as in other parts of the country. Rockefeller had worked with King to ensure that New York was a leader in passing civil service legislation. In this message, he promoted the idea that King’s legacy could best be honored by deeds rather than words, and urged the Legislature to pass urban development and human rights initiatives that would use government as a means for social justice.

New York State Archives Collection


New York State Municipal Assistance Corporation (“Big MAC”), 1975

Governor Hugh L. Carey led the effort to establish the Municipal Assistance Corporation, called “Big MAC,” in 1975. The MAC rescued New York City from financial collapse, through state-supervised sales of long-term bonds at favorable rates. New York City’s credit rating soon revived, but the crisis foreshadowed deeper fiscal crises of the early 2000s. The complex provisions establishing MAC are found in this original law signed by Governor Carey.

New York State Archives Collection, Series 13036


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